Bergamot Orange

20.02.2018

The word bergamot is etymologically derived from the Italian word “bergamotto”.

Our country, Italy and, specifically,  Calabria, has the original cultivar. The name of the fruit is related to French bergamote, but, maybe, Turkish is the  origin: bey armudu or bey armut (“prince’s pear” or “prince of pears”).

Tha botanic classification is Citrus bergamia and you can admire Citrus bergamia as a small tree that blossoms during the winter, its juice tastes less sour than lemon, but more bitter than grapefruit.

Now, Citrus bergamia is sometimes confused with (but is not the same as):
• Citrus medica – citron, the yellow fruit of which is also known as etrog; or
• Citrus limetta, the “sweet lemon” or “sweet lime”.

Its original cultivar production is completely limited to the Ionian Sea coastal areas of the province of Reggio di Calabria in Italy, most of the bergamot comes from a short stretch of land there, where the temperature is favourable.

About human uses, in Food and drink, the fruit of the bergamot orange is edible, you can obtain Bergamot marmalade and essence extracted from the aromatic skin of this sour fruit is used to flavour Earl Grey and Lady Grey teas, as well as confectionery. In Sweden and Norway, bergamot is a very common flavourant in snus, a smokeless tobacco product.

OTOH, Bergamot essential oil and Bergamot peel is used in perfumery for its ability to combine with an array of scents to form a bouquet of aromas which complement each other. For example, Bergamot is a major component of many original Eau de Cologne, while Bergamot essential oil is popular in aromatherapy.

Bergamot contains extremely large amounts of polyphenols, as compared to other citrus species. They are healty in many ways. Therefore its nature of healthy superfood is justly claimed.

Further, the juice of the fruit has been used in Calabrian indigenous medicine to treat malaria.

 

Juice of Bergamot: Superfood drink

21.1.2018

 

PROPERTIES AND FUNCTIONS

Thanks to about 350 polyphenols, Bergamot of Calabria has antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and vasoprotective properties. In addition, the juice can reduce blood glucose and activate some organic antioxidants, while the flavonoids present in bergamot juice are very good relaxants as well, they soothe the nerves and reduce nervous stress, insomnia, and depression.

The essential bergamot oil inside the juice stimulates appetite, liver and pancreatic functions. The juice is useful in cholecystitis, in tachycardia and arterial hypertension; it is locally useful in stomatitis, gingivitis and pharyngitis; it is an intestinal, disinfectant and astringent pesticide. Finally, it is balsamic in the respiratory tract.

For the vitamin C, Bl and B2, P and vitamin A and E content in juice and flavedo, bergamot can be considered a fruit with good vitamin content, and its juice a “superfood drink”; therefore, it is useful in bone disorders due to altered calcium absorption, teething disorders, collagen pathologies, muscular weakness or even neuromuscular hyper-excitability, cardiac heretism, iron deficiency anaemia, hepatic congestion and various diseases with impaired vessel permeability.

On a nutritional level, bergamot juice, with the weak acids contained in it (acetic, malic, citric, tartaric acids…), gives rise to the production of carbonates and carbonate alkaline (potassium and calcium above all), which in addition to promoting intestinal calcium absorption, contribute to maintaining the alkaline reserve.

 

MIXING OF THE JUICE

Bergamot is available from October to March, so its juice can be drunk natural,  diluted with a little water, or sweetened with an Earl Grey Tea. Further,  it can be mixed with orange juice. Bergamot juice is a perfect Mediterranean drink, when added to prosecco or to sparkling water.

This mixing of the juice can be used to reduce pain from headaches and muscle tension or as digestive drink. Further, if you add juice to flavour yoghurt, you will obtain a perfect mix or, freezing it, a refreshing sorbet.